What are the most common sex injuries? A new survey reveals unpleasant findings

Ouch!

woman holding on to pillow in bed
(Image credit: Getty Images / Tara Moore)

Like contact sports, the deed can have physical repercussions if you're not careful. 

Although sex injuries might not be at the forefront of couples' minds—compared to the likes of dirty talk, foreplay ideas and, ultimately, orgasms—a few mishaps are not entirely out of the realm of possibility. 

Lovehoney (opens in new tab) decided to dig deep to uncover exactly the types of wounds and scars lovers experienced after an intense evening between the sheets. Might want to swap out the best sex toys for bandaids and creams. (Kidding...sort of.)

What are the most common sex injuries?

In the event you weren't stressed about sex, Lovehoney has surveyed 2,000 Brits to reveal the most common bedroom mishaps, which just might put the accident prone on high alert. The injuries, as well as the percentage of Brits who've experienced them, are as follows: 

  • Carpet burn: 65% 
  • Bruises: 54%
  • Pulled muscle: 39%
  • UTI: 23%
  • Back injury: 16%
  • Vaginal tear: 11%
  • Hemorrhoids: 5%
  • Anal tear: 5%
  • Penis fracture: 3%
  • Stuck foreign object: 3%
  • Broken penis: 3%
  • Broken bone: 2%

Couple having sex

(Image credit: Getty Images)

And, a few more eye-opening stats from Loveyhoney's research: men were found to be more prone to bedroom disasters than women (36%), and those between the age of 35-44 experienced the most sex injuries in the UK (47%).  

As far as the most hazardous sex positions? Missionary, cowgirl and doggy style apparently contribute to the most injuries. Perhaps the best exercises for better sex will make couples more agile?

The way to flag these potential problems before they happen is to be open and try talking about sex with your partner, according to Ness Cooper, a sex and relationships expert at The Sex Consultant (opens in new tab). This way, everyone is on the same page as far as desires and capabilities. Cooper is also in favor of adding a safeword to the mix.

"Safewords can ensure you understand when your play partner has reached their physical and/ or psychological limit," she said. "Safewords help keep the play consensual, safe and prevent unwanted injuries."

And, though it goes without saying, cleaning sex toys properly is the key to preventing any unwanted issues. It's a step that can be overlooked, but it can save you a lot of trouble in the long run. 

You can check out the research in its entirety at Lovehoney (opens in new tab)

Danielle is a writer for woman&home and My Imperfect Life, covering all-things news, lifestyle and entertainment. 


The heart of her time at Future has been devoted to My Imperfect Life, where she's been attuned to the cosmos and honed in on astrology coverage within the Life vertical. She's partial to writing pieces about the next big TV obsession—anyone else impatiently waiting for "Conversations with Friends"—and keeping you up to date on new trends like the latest must-have from Zara. 


Before her time at Future, Danielle was the editor of Time Out New York Kids and a news editor at Elite Daily. Her work has also appeared in Domino, Chowhound, amNewYork and Newsday, among other outlets. 


When Danielle is not working, you can usually find her reading a new book, coffee at hand, or attempting a new recipe. (Recommendations always welcome!)