Tarot questions to ask the pros if you're new to the practice

Here's what to do...and what not to do when selecting tarot questions to ask

deck of tarot cards on a yellow background
(Image credit: Tatâna Maramygina / EyeEm/Getty Images)

In search of a little spiritual guidance? There are tarot questions to ask—and avoid—when speaking to the pros. 

Whether you're looking for a little clarity with your 2022 horoscope or feel as though you need an alternative for manifesting with crystals, now might be the time to turn to the tarot. 

We spoke to the pros, astrologers Renée Watt and Liz Simmons, about tips for those who are new to the art form, so no need to feel stressed about booking a reading. Though the practice can be subjective, universal guidelines will help get you on the proper path.

Liz Simmons

Liz is a self-taught astrologer and tarot reader who blends Hellenistic and modern techniques that utilizes the tropical zodiac, Placidus House system and Whole House system.

Renée Watt

Astrologer Renée Watt has offered her expertise for a variety of publications, including Cosmo, InStyle, Girlboss and more. She hosts a weekly podcast called "The Glitter Cast" (opens in new tab) and is a cohost of the occult livestream “Betwixt The Shadows.”

Tarot questions to ask: tips for beginners

1. Come prepared and receptive

It might be a minute since you've received a homework assignment, but do go into a session with a topic that you feel needs a deep dive, be it your romantic relationships or career path. 

"When going into a tarot reading it's great to have some questions ready if there's a specific area of your life that you feel needs examining," says Watt. "On the other hand, it's totally okay to go in with zero expectations or questions prepared, as long as you keep an open mind."

Simmons says the tarot is not likely to hold back, so embrace whatever the universe wants you to receive. 

2. Provide a few details

You're not going to get anywhere if you're not candid, so do be sure to come prepared to be honest about your expectations and what's working (or not). 

"It can also be helpful to explain your situation, since giving a small amount of background information can help your reader pick up on the energetic nuances of your life," Watt says. 

3. Be respectful 

"If anything, I would warn clients to steer away from morally or ethically inappropriate questions—anything that may have to do with death, health, politics or even being nosy about other people," Simmons suggests. 

Midsection Of Woman Holding Tarot Cards At Table - stock photo

(Image credit: Getty Images)

4. Keep it general

"I think most people should start with general questions to get the reading flowing while keeping it open-ended," Simmons says. 

Likewise, Watt notes that if you get a little too particular, the reader could be overwhelmed and you might be directing the session towards what you want to hear verses what you're meant to hear.

A few general questions include: 

  • What messages do I need to hear at this time?
  • What information should be passed on to me during this reading?
  • What might happen during the next TK days, weeks, months or years?

5. Don't expect nitty-gritty relationship details

So, you've had your defining the relationship talk and you're curious how the romance will continue to unfold. While expecting a wedding date prediction isn't necessarily in the cards (get it?!) there are ways to see where matters of the heart will take you. 

Again, general questions like the ones below are your best bet, but there is an important tidbit to note. 

"For a love reading, someone should base their questions on their current relationship status," Simmons says.

  • What is my next relationship like?
  • What do I need to work on before finding love?
  • What will my partner and I learn from one another? 
  • What is the plausible future of this relationship? 
  • How do my partner and I view one another?

6. Focus on improvement

Whether you're looking for a new relationship or anxious to put the working from home tips to bed once and for all, all the areas that you're exploring should focus on improvement—not mind-reading. Ask for ways to better your situation, not for the end-all-be-all answer that's simply not realistic.

Danielle is a writer for woman&home and My Imperfect Life, covering all-things news, lifestyle and entertainment. 


The heart of her time at Future has been devoted to My Imperfect Life, where she's been attuned to the cosmos and honed in on astrology coverage within the Life vertical. She's partial to writing pieces about the next big TV obsession—anyone else impatiently waiting for "Conversations with Friends"—and keeping you up to date on new trends like the latest must-have from Zara. 


Before her time at Future, Danielle was the editor of Time Out New York Kids and a news editor at Elite Daily. Her work has also appeared in Domino, Chowhound, amNewYork and Newsday, among other outlets. 


When Danielle is not working, you can usually find her reading a new book, coffee at hand, or attempting a new recipe. (Recommendations always welcome!)