Who is West Elm Caleb? Meet the serial ghoster causing chaos on Hinge and TikTok

Everyone on social media is asking: "Who is West Elm Caleb?" In short, he's the type of guy that Carrie Bradshaw probably would've warned us about

phone illustrations with messages and hearts meant to symbolize online dating
(Image credit: Getty Images/akinbostanci)

We've heard the myths, the legends, but who is West Elm Caleb exactly? 

Finding a match in New York City is no easy feat, and even the best online dating apps are susceptible to luring in fellas who are just looking to play games. However, Caleb's jig is up. 

So what exactly is going on? Who is this handsome, charming, ghosting guy from the Upper East Side? How did the furniture store West Elm—with the oh-so lovable industrial coffee table, we might add—end up in the scenario? We'll take you through the Hinge-turned-TikTok disaster, so buckle up!



Who is West Elm Caleb?

Caleb, an alleged 6'4" Upper East Sider who works for the popular furniture company, is causing quite a stir on Hinge. The 25-year-old has been pretending to be on the hunt for a serious relationship, but ultimately, he showers women with affection briefly before completely ghosting them. 

This is not an entirely unheard of concept, but what makes the situation even more frustrating is that he has supposedly sent his Hinge dates playlists he's created with other women in mind—a move most of us would make in high school. More problematically, Caleb has even been accused of sending matches unwanted intimate photos, which is a huge violation of consent. 

Apparently, a few clever New York City ladies caught wind of this dater's suspicious behavior and decided to take to the video-sharing platform to alert followers that Caleb is not to be trusted—even if he can score you a discount on living room rugs. 

As a result #WestElmCaleb was born and graced FYP across the app. If your recent match has any of these similar qualities, you might want to consider backing out of the date.

TikTok users @kellsbellsbaby, @_katepear and @kateglavan (sensing a pattern here?) have all alleged that Caleb tricked them into thinking he was smitten, when in fact, he was just looking to play games. It appears they were all dating a narcissist.

@kellsbellsbaby (opens in new tab)

♬ original sound - kell (opens in new tab)
@kateglavan (opens in new tab)

♬ original sound - kateglavan (opens in new tab)
@_katepear (opens in new tab)

♬ original sound - Kate Pearce (opens in new tab)

Despite this man's bad behavior and the discomfort he caused with unsolicited photos, his whereabouts and information are now viral knowledge, which is a scary side of dating apps and social media. Yes, his alleged antics are atrocious and unwelcome, but it's mind-boggling to think how easy it is to pinpoint one person in a sea of dating apps. 

Do be mindful of what you're posting and who you're connecting with when sharing fun clips on TikTok or flirty messages on Hinge, Bumble and the like. We know online dating and mental health are not always in sync, but physical safety and wellbeing are other important factors that cannot go ignored. 

Fortunately, Gen Z and Millennial daters are on the hunt for love in 2022, so app users are more likely to come across serious contenders rather than a West Elm Caleb. Happy swiping, and do be cautious, folks—it's tricky in the world of online dating! 

Danielle is a writer for woman&home and My Imperfect Life, covering all-things news, lifestyle and entertainment. 


The heart of her time at Future has been devoted to My Imperfect Life, where she's been attuned to the cosmos and honed in on astrology coverage within the Life vertical. She's partial to writing pieces about the next big TV obsession—anyone else impatiently waiting for "Conversations with Friends"—and keeping you up to date on new trends like the latest must-have from Zara. 


Before her time at Future, Danielle was the editor of Time Out New York Kids and a news editor at Elite Daily. Her work has also appeared in Domino, Chowhound, amNewYork and Newsday, among other outlets. 


When Danielle is not working, you can usually find her reading a new book, coffee at hand, or attempting a new recipe. (Recommendations always welcome!)