Britney Spears' life and conservatorship will be the focus of new BBC doc

A 'Free Britney' documentary has been picked up by yet another broadcaster, bringing Spears back into the spotlight

US rock star Britney Spears arrives 24 January 2004 at Cannes' Palais des Festivals, for France's annual NRJ music awards. The awards are held as the International music industry descends on Cannes, southern France, for the annual MIDEM trade jamboree, the music world's premier trade show. The NRJ pop music station's awards are based on a public vote, with around 50 artists competing for 15 awards. NRJ is a popular commercial FM radio network whose name, when pronounced in French, makes the word "energy"
(Image credit: Getty/ PASCAL GUYOT)

Broadcasters are lining up to document Britney Spears' sudden and dramatic rise to fame, following the recent Hulu documentary Framing Britney Spears. 

Since the documentary aired last month, Netflix has pledged to make its own documentary recount of the pop star's life. And now the BBC is following suit—the British Broadcasting Corporation has also announced the release of a docu-film centered on the singer's long-standing legal arrangements and the #FreeBritney campaign.   

Instead of focusing on Spears' entire career and time in the spotlight, the BBC has promised that its documentary, which will feature BAFTA-winning journalist Mobeen Azharand, for a deeper look into the star's contentious conservatorship.

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Mobeen Azharand will visit the pop star's hometown of Kentwood, Louisiana as well as current residence of Los Angeles, California, in the BBC documentary, which is slated to air on BBC Two later this spring.

In order to learn more about the woman behind the headlines, Azharand will attend court hearings and speak with Spears' friends and family. Since news of the documentary has leaked, Azharand has come out and said: "I went to LA in search of the truth of how Britney Spears, one of the biggest pop stars on the planet, ended up in a conservatorship." 

Azharand explained. "I found myself in a world of lawyers, superfans and paparazzi and spent time with many of the people who’ve had a front-row seat in Britney’s life. This film taps into the energy of the #FreeBritney movement and questions the industry, fandom and the laws that facilitate conservatorship."

Singer Britney Spears on stage at the 2008 MTV Video Music Awards at Paramount Pictures Studios on September 7, 2008 in Los Angeles, California.

(Image credit: Getty/ Jason Merritt/TERM )

A month before the BBC's announcement, a judge had denied Britney Spears' father's request for total control over her finances. 

The judge examined the current legalities surrounding the conservatorship, which Jamie Spears (Britney's father) has had complete control over since 2008. Even though Britney Spears had contested the current hold on her finances, the court saw it fit to uphold the previous ruling that authorized a financial firm as the singer's co-conservator. 

While all these recent changes are going on in Spears' life, the BBC has assured viewers that they will continue to follow the court cases.