What is 'Fresh' on Hulu about? This is a dating story you weren't expecting

Things are NOT what they seem. If you're curious what is 'Fresh' on Hulu about, prepare for your jaw to drop

Sebastian Stan and Daisy Edgar-Jones on Fresh on Hulu, What is Fresh on Hulu about
(Image credit: Searchlight Pictures/Hulu)

We're already intrigued by its stars but what is Fresh on Hulu about? Once you peel back the layers of the seemingly sweet rom-com, you're left with an unexpectedly dark, comedic experience. 

Viewers meet Noa (played by the beloved master of the fringe hairstyle and all-around cool-girl, Daisy Edgar-Jones). The Portland-based millennial has yet to encounter any dating green flags, so when the apps fail her, she embraces whatever comes her way. 

In what looks to be the ideal meet-cute, Noa crosses paths with a tall, kind and handsome fella at the grocery store. Steve (Sebastian Stan) just might be her twin flame...but there's one very big catch. 



What is 'Fresh' on Hulu about?

Things advance quickly for Noa and Steve, the perfect example of the fast-forwarding dating trend. Shortly after the first date comes a kiss, a weekend away and one very shocking truth bomb. 

Noa's BFF senses something is off when Steve is unsearchable on social media, but nevertheless, Noa blows off this tidbit and proceeds. But when she learns of his odd eating habits, they simply cannot be ignored. It's not the typical "He wants sushi and I want Mexican"—Steve prefers another type of cuisine entirely.  

Watch the 'Fresh' trailer:

Can you sense where they're going with Steve's odd dining preferences? Hint: they pair perfectly with a bottle of Chianti.

That's right, folks! Mimi Cave's "wickedly funny... dazzling feature debut," according to The New York Times, is actually a cannibal romance. How's that for an interesting genre? And you thought The Tinder Swindler was problematic. 

Fresh is certainly a far cry from Jones' last Hulu sensation, Normal People, which is based on the bestselling novel by Sally Rooney. (Psst: Conversations with Friends, Hulu's next Rooney adaptation, will hit screens later this spring.) Before your Fresh binge, we suggest going with the vegetarian option at dinner. 

How to watch 'Fresh' the movie:

The unexpected and unique debut hit Hulu on Friday, March 4. Subscription options are available below. 

Daisy Edgar-Jones on 'Fresh'

In a candid interview on the PEOPLE Every Day podcast (opens in new tab), Jones makes a very interesting point about this unique plot. 

"My friends and I talked about this quite a lot: Why is it that so often that women enjoy watching true crime—or not enjoy it, but we have this sort of wanting to watch it because so often the victim is a woman," she told the outlet. "How would we be in this situation or how would I react?"

How would we be in this situation?! Oh, you mean dating a real-life Hannibal Lecter? Well, if that isn't a predicament, we're not entirely sure what is. (For the record, Fresh is fictional.) 

Once you wrap up Fresh, be sure to hop on over to Netflix if you're looking for thrills: Worst Roommate Ever, though heavy on the scares but not the laughs, is a true-crime documentary about lodgers that were up to no good. The Tinder Swindler, also on Netflix, is a real-life too-good-to-be-true dating dilemma, though fortunately, there's no cannibalism in that story. 

Enjoy your marathon, friends—the new streams are getting more unique by the week!

Danielle is a writer for woman&home and My Imperfect Life, covering all-things news, lifestyle and entertainment. 


The heart of her time at Future has been devoted to My Imperfect Life, where she's been attuned to the cosmos and honed in on astrology coverage within the Life vertical. She's partial to writing pieces about the next big TV obsession—anyone else impatiently waiting for "Conversations with Friends"—and keeping you up to date on new trends like the latest must-have from Zara. 


Before her time at Future, Danielle was the editor of Time Out New York Kids and a news editor at Elite Daily. Her work has also appeared in Domino, Chowhound, amNewYork and Newsday, among other outlets. 


When Danielle is not working, you can usually find her reading a new book, coffee at hand, or attempting a new recipe. (Recommendations always welcome!)