TikTokers are using a blowdryer to curl their eyelashes in a bizarre beauty trend

The TikTok eyelash curler hack might seem convenient, but the pros have some thoughts

woman posing for a close up, showing her eye, eyebrow and some hair.
(Image credit: Getty Images)

In hopes to outsmart Maybelline, beauty buffs are testing out the TikTok eyelash curler hack for a more voluminous look. 

Although the makeup tip is nothing new, it's been revived for a social media-obsessed audience and younger generation. Heating these sensitive lashes to curl them has been debated long before we got our hands on the Dyson Supersonic hairdryer.

Now, we're seeing the resurgence of the technique thanks to a viral video from TikTok user @sophiamasterton. A clear proponent of the move, she's taken to the platform to show her following just how this eye trick is done. Her method? Keep the lashes dry (don't add water) and set your blowdryer to the cool setting. She notes that she likes to start from the root up, which is less intense for her lashes. 

"They don't really get dry, but sometimes they start to water and I just close my eyes," she says.



TikTok eyelash curler hack—where the trend began

See the trick for yourself below. And you thought your hair routine was high maintenance! This is an awful lot of work for some tiny strands.

@sophiamasterton (opens in new tab)

Reply to @bebsurino answering a couple questions. I like the way they curl from the root up this way so that’s why I do it 💓 & it feels less rough on the lashes ##mascarahack ##fyp ##makeup

♬ original sound - Sophia Masterton (opens in new tab)

Is the TikTok eyelash curler hack safe?

Although there are heated curlers that are more suitable for your eyes than your hair, that doesn't necessarily mean you should be exposing this part of your face to such extremities. 

Makeup artist and My Zen Den (opens in new tab) founder Alexandria Gilleo, who pleads guilty to giving this trend a try back in the day, believes it won't work.

"The skin around our eye area is sensitive and applying that amount of heat can cause that area to become irritated, if not burned," she said. "Also, you want to nourish your lashes. By using a blowdryer, you can cause damage and breakage and thin out the hair instead of strengthening and lengthening."

Instead, why not focus on finding the proper product? The Essence Lash Princess False Lash Effect Mascara, a mere $5, sells once in every 10 seconds for a reason, folks. Meanwhile, the Maybelline Sky High Mascara, another TikTok cult favorite, takes your look to new heights, like the name suggests—no heat required.

If you could get the look you're dying for without risk, give it a whirl. Sometimes it's trial and error, but there are discounts aplenty during the holidays, including the Sephora Beauty for All sale. Try a few products and compare!

"RevitaLash has a fantastic lash mask to coat and nourish your lashes overnight," Gilleo suggests. Have a look at some of the physician formulated and tested (opens in new tab) products to see if they are something that can potentially strengthen your lashes, and in turn, give you the look you're craving. 

As far as whipping out the blowdryer to enhance the look, toss this under the wildest TikTok trends 2021 has given us, right behind the likes of the frozen beauty blenders and the unthinkable beauty buffs who decided to use lube as base makeup

If you ever have concerns about a beauty "hack," consult a professional before attempting yourself.

Danielle is a writer for woman&home and My Imperfect Life, covering all-things news, lifestyle and entertainment. 


The heart of her time at Future has been devoted to My Imperfect Life, where she's been attuned to the cosmos and honed in on astrology coverage within the Life vertical. She's partial to writing pieces about the next big TV obsession—anyone else impatiently waiting for "Conversations with Friends"—and keeping you up to date on new trends like the latest must-have from Zara. 


Before her time at Future, Danielle was the editor of Time Out New York Kids and a news editor at Elite Daily. Her work has also appeared in Domino, Chowhound, amNewYork and Newsday, among other outlets. 


When Danielle is not working, you can usually find her reading a new book, coffee at hand, or attempting a new recipe. (Recommendations always welcome!)