When is 'Bridgerton' set? Go back in time with the sexy period drama

Did you ever stop to wonder 'When is Bridgerton set'? Before you get caught up with the Viscount, let's have a quick history lesson

Season 2 of Bridgerton with Anthony and Kate. When is Bridgerton set?
(Image credit: Liam Daniel/Netflix © 2022)

We're delighted to return to high society, but when is Bridgerton set exactly?

If we're going to spend eight episodes navigating the sensuous Bridgerton love triangle and all that awaits Viscount Anthony (Jonathan Bailey), it would be rather improper not to nail down the basics, wouldn't you agree?

As you prepare for another steamy, regal season of one of Netflix's most-watched series, let's take a step back in time to learn a little bit more about the Bridgertons' world. 



When is 'Bridgerton' set?

We meet Daphne and co. in Mayfair, London in 1813, at the very start of the Regency era (1811-1820). In addition to the grandeur and sophisticated decorum, the Regency time period was well known for creativity: there were continually new discoveries in art, literature, science and music, among other areas of interest.

Politically speaking, Prince George IV came to rule in place of his ailing father, King George III, and acted as “Regent." Prince George’s mother, Queen Charlotte—who is portrayed on the Netflix hit by Guyanese-British actress Golda Rosheuvel—continued to serve as the queen consort of the United Kingdom. 

This was all on the heels of the Napoleonic wars and a transformational time for the people of the Ton (a.k.a. town). We feel fancy simply thinking about it!

Bridgerton season 2, Netflix

(Image credit: Netflix)

Is 'Bridgerton' historically accurate?

Creator Chris Van Dusen spoke about the show's chosen period to The Hollywood Reporter (opens in new tab): “I’ve always loved the period genre. There’s that 1995 BBC Pride and Prejudice adaptation with Colin Firth, with him coming out of the lake and his white shirt. I remember watching that a lot, and that was inspiring in developing the show.” (We'll say—that Bridgerton lake scene in season two is already causing a buzz!)

He added: “Looking at these period pieces, they’re often considered a little more traditional and a little more conservative. I’ve always wanted to see a period piece that went further, that pushes boundaries and challenges the very idea of what a period piece can really be.”

Though the production utilized the skills of historical consultant Hannah Greig, who also worked on The Favourite and The Duchess, Bridgerton regularly pushes historical boundaries, from the color-conscious casting of its characters to the violin-covered pop songs chosen for its many ballroom scenes. (Robyn's seminal "Dancing On My Own" and Harry Styles' "Sign of the Times" score key scenes of season two, just some of the many excellent Bridgerton season 2 soundtrack moments.)

"It's important to remember that Bridgerton isn't a history lesson," Bridgerton author Julia Quinn told Entertainment Weekly (opens in new tab). "The show is for a modern audience."

That said, inclusions like the sumptuous color palette and the ubiquitous corsets the actresses wear (ladies at that time wore stays) are less about historical correctness and more about creating a vibe

Regency romance novels and other sub-genres

Shondaland expertly crafted a period romance for Netflix, but the Bridgerton brood all came together thanks to romance novelist Julia Quinn. (Psst: here's how to read the Bridgerton books in order, if you're looking for recs.) 

As any fan of historical romance novels knows, there are a few different eras in which steamy stories are set, including but not limited to:  

  • The Viking Age
  • Colonial America
  • Regency England 
  • Victorian England

Given the fancy flair of the Regency era, we're more than willing to get lost in another chapter of this family's history. (Is anyone else particularly looking forward to Benedict's story?)

Ruby Stokes as Francesca Bridgerton, Phoebe Dyvenor as Daphne Basset, Will Tilston as Gregory Bridgerton, Florence Emilia Hunt as Hyacinth Bridgerton, Ruth Gemmell as Lady Violet Bridgerton, Luke Thompson as Benedict Bridgerton, Jonathan Bailey as Anthony Bridgerton in episode 201 of Bridgerton

(Image credit: LIAM DANIEL/NETFLIX)

Where is 'Bridgerton' set?

In order to make the series seem as realistic as possible, the Shondaland crew had expertly scouted for the perfect environment. Needless to say, it was a success. 

Bridgerton filming locations abounded in Bath, even though the series is set primarily in London. From the Wilton House to the Syon House, the Hampton Court Palace in London to the Hatfield House in Hertfordshire, each spot is absurdly beautiful. 

If you are curious what it's like to live the Regency dream, housing experts nailed down what it would cost to live in the Bridgerton residences, and let's just say there are a lot of numbers involved. (No surprise there!)

Now that you're all caught up with your history lesson, it's time to indulge in a Netflix binge and pick up with the next hopeful romantic of the clan. Though the Bridgerton sex scenes are toned down a bit for the sophomore installment—there's a creative reason why—we have a feeling this season is still going to be as romantic and engaging as its predecessor.

We'll see you in Mayfair!

Danielle is a writer for woman&home and My Imperfect Life, covering all-things news, lifestyle and entertainment. 


The heart of her time at Future has been devoted to My Imperfect Life, where she's been attuned to the cosmos and honed in on astrology coverage within the Life vertical. She's partial to writing pieces about the next big TV obsession—anyone else impatiently waiting for "Conversations with Friends"—and keeping you up to date on new trends like the latest must-have from Zara. 


Before her time at Future, Danielle was the editor of Time Out New York Kids and a news editor at Elite Daily. Her work has also appeared in Domino, Chowhound, amNewYork and Newsday, among other outlets. 


When Danielle is not working, you can usually find her reading a new book, coffee at hand, or attempting a new recipe. (Recommendations always welcome!)

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